Author Archives: Contributor

Podcast: The Broader Significance of the 1860s

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Episode-12.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn April 22, 2017, Heidi Bohaker and Paula Hastings  delivered their talk “The Broader Significance of the 1860s.” The talk was part of “The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World,” a symposium hosted by the Department of History at the University of Toronto as part of its Canada 150 events…. Read more »

“History Teaching at its Best:” Some Thoughts on History Teaching, Passion, and the University Classroom

Adam Chapnick When I read Andrew Nurse’s first post for the Beyond the Lecture series, I was both delighted and frustrated.  Delighted because I continue to believe that, as academic historians, we have an obligation to think more seriously about the craft of teaching; frustrated because how far behind we Canadians are in this reflective process.  This is one reason… Read more »

Podcast: Putting Flesh on the Bones: The Meaning of the BNA Act in Confederation Era Canada

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Episode-10-Penny-Bryden.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn April 22, 2017, Penny Bryden delivered her talk “Putting Flesh on the Bones: The Meaning of the BNA Act in Confederation Era Canada.” The talk was part of “The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World,” a symposium hosted by the Department of History at the University of Toronto as… Read more »

Podcast: Irish Nationalisms and Canadian Confederation

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Episode-09-David-Wilson.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn April 22, 2017, David Wilson delivered his talk “Irish Nationalisms and Canadian Confederation.” The talk was part of “The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World,” a symposium hosted by the Department of History at the University of Toronto as part of its Canada 150 events. This talk is part… Read more »

In Pursuit of Excellence: The Importance of Mentorship in Academia

Katrina Ackerman As the winter semester comes to an end and students prepare to enter graduate programs in September, I have thought a lot about the students who turned to me as a mentor and the ways in which professors helped students from lower socioeconomic groups, like me, navigate academia. In the current academic market, mentors should prepare their students… Read more »

Podcast: A Tale of Two Empires: Race and Revolution in the 1860s Caribbean

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Episode-08-Melania-Newton.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn April 22, 2017, Melanie Newton delivered her talk “A Tale of Two Empires: Race and Revolution in the 1860s Caribbean.” The talk was part of “The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World,” a symposium hosted by the Department of History at the University of Toronto as part of its… Read more »

“I have never seen anything finer”: First Impressions and Sightseeing in Depression-Era Soviet Union

This post is part of a series, a virtual tour of the Depression-era Soviet Union, in part through the eyes of Canadians who traveled there and, in part, through Kirk Niergarth’s eyes as he attempted to retrace some of their steps during a trip to Russia in 2014. The previous installment is available here.  By Kirk Niergarth What do you… Read more »

Podcast: Cosmopolitanism in James Barry’s Diary: The Atlantic World Views of a 19th-Century Nova Scotia Miller

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Episode-07-Dan-Samson.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn April 22, 2017, Dan Samson delivered his talk “Cosmopolitanism in James Berry’s Diary: The Atlantic World Views of a 19th-Century Nova Scotia Miller.” The talk was part of “The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World,” a symposium hosted by the Department of History at the University of Toronto as… Read more »

The Ironies of the Wired Society: The Internet and Contemporary History

By Andrew Nurse The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born; in this interregnum a great variety of morbid symptoms appear. ~Antonio Gramsci Over the last generation, a series of “post” and “neo” ideologies prophesied fundamental change already evolving around us: a new era was being born. This has not really… Read more »

Immersed in the Past: Room-Scale Virtual Reality for Public History

Sean Kheraj Last year, I wrote about my early impressions of the possible uses of virtual reality technology for public history and history education. I also led a session in my fourth-year digital history class on virtual reality and its potential for generating a sense of historical presence, an ability to simulate the sensation of standing in past places. I… Read more »