Contributor

Celebration as History; History as Celebration

July 3, 2014

By Andrew Nurse Celebrate: to observe (a day) or commemorate (an event) with ceremonies or festivities ~Dictionary.com Celebrations don’t have a particularly good reputation among professional historians … and, for good reason. As a series of studies of national, regionalized, local and provincial commemorative events demonstrate, celebrations are politically fraught. Canada Day might stand — […]

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Polls and the Crisis of Confidence

June 19, 2014

By Jonathan McQuarrie Why do newspapers support the public-opinion polls?…Not only do the modern polls, based on a small, carefully selected cross section, provide more accurate measurements; they can be applied to give continuous and rapid measurements of public opinion at all times. -George Gallup and Saul Forbes Rae, The Pulse of Democracy, 1940, 119. […]

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An Idea Whose Time Has Come: A City Museum for Toronto

June 17, 2014

By Daniel Ross and Jay Young The Toronto Civic Museum, Humanitas, the Global City Museum: over the last forty years Toronto has seen a number of bold proposals for a city museum, but up until now there has been a distinct lack of shovels in the ground (or exhibits in the halls, as the case […]

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Eye of the Storm: History, Past and Future at the University of Saskatchewan

June 12, 2014

By Merle Massie The University of Saskatchewan has been front and center in national and international news this past spring, owing to the public fallout of an ugly internal battle regarding the university’s past and future directions. And historians have been active generals and foot soldiers on all sides of the battle. Because when you’re […]

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A Berks Retrospective: Feminist Mentorship and Inequality in the Ivory Tower

May 29, 2014

By Beth A. Robertson In anticipation of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, Adele Perry wrote of the ongoing power of women’s history to “challenge and unsettle”. Reflecting on the success of the Berks this past weekend, one cannot fault Perry for being optimistic. I had the opportunity to present at this conference, held in […]

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Carpe Aqua: Asian Carp, Invasive Species, and the Great Lakes

May 22, 2014

By Daniel Macfarlane Invasive species in the Great Lakes have been a big problem for decades. From the alewife, which first appeared in the Great Lakes in the 1800s, to the zebra mussels in recent decades, the composition of the Great Lakes biomass has been constantly in flux. And the problem is about to get […]

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Oil Pipeline Spill History at the National Energy Board of Canada Library

May 8, 2014

By Sean Kheraj This week, I am taking advantage of some of the historical research materials available at the National Energy Board library in Calgary, Alberta. As we discussed on a recent episode of Nature’s Past: Canadian Environmental History Podcast, federal department libraries are incredible resources for environmental history. With the closure and consolidation of […]

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The CBC, Budget Cuts, and the Environmental Movement

April 30, 2014

By Ryan O’Connor On April 10th CBC/Radio Canada announced an immediate budget cut of $130 million. This move will have dire consequences for the network, with 657 jobs cut over the next two years, numerous service cutbacks, and a reduction in original television programming. Having already lost the Canadian rights to broadcast the National Hockey […]

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The Value of Thinking Big: Experimenting with Pedestrian Space in Toronto, 1970s and 2014

April 28, 2014

By Daniel Ross In cities across Canada, citizens are emerging from their winter hibernation to a spring and summer season packed with street festivals, concerts, and other special events. In Toronto alone there are hundreds each year, from Salsa on St. Clair to Pride to the literary Word on the Street, and on summer weekends […]

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How Does History Help Explain Bitcoins?

April 16, 2014

By Jonathan McQuarrie Lately, Bitcoins have received considerable attention from the media. The recent failure of the Tokyo-based Mt. Gox exchange, where users could exchange their Bitcoins for national currencies, sparked particular concern. The website managed to lose some 850,000 Bitcoins, which at the time were valued at approximately $400 million. For the last month, […]

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