Guest

November 8, 1994

July 23, 2014

Jessica Shaw, PhD candidate, University of Calgary Abortion evokes strong political and emotional reactions, and tends to be framed around arguments of morality and legality. However, women have had and will continue to have abortions regardless of their morality, regardless of their legality, regardless of what the foetus may or may not be, and regardless […]

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Scientific Reasoning in the Canadian Anti-Abortion Movement

July 22, 2014

Katrina Ackerman, PhD Candidate, University of Waterloo Recent media coverage of an Alberta doctor’s refusal to prescribe birth control to walk-in clinic patients indicates the medical profession’s ongoing struggle to balance personal morality and professional ethics. Whether a doctor should be able to deny birth control prescriptions or abortion referrals based on moral or religious […]

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Abortion: The Unfinished Revolution Conference, August 7-8, 2014, Charlottetown, PEI

July 21, 2014

Dr. Shannon Stettner, Special Series Guest Editor It’s hard to study abortion without being an activist.  Reading about or hearing women’s experiences with unplanned pregnancies, past and present, and the challenges they encounter and overcome – or don’t – in their efforts to end those pregnancies is politicizing. When you study abortion experiences from the […]

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Situating War Resistance within Canadian History

July 10, 2014

By Jessica Squires At this year’s Canadian Historical Association meeting in St. Catharines, I participated in a round table discussion about war resistance. As the panel showed, war resistance history is a growing area of research, offering a different perspective on traditional histories of war, politics, international relations, and social movements. The panelists included Bruce […]

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Marking WWI with a Travelling Exhibit

July 8, 2014

By Timothy Humphries As the official guardian of Ontario’s historical record, the Archives of Ontario is keenly aware that it must offer the public easy access to its vast and diverse holdings, and provide widespread opportunities to know more about our province’s rich and storied past. To this end, the Archives has long sought partnerships […]

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Politicians, Organizers, and the Making of Quebec’s National Holiday’s Public Policy, 1976-1984

June 24, 2014

By Marc-André Gagnon Spreading across North America in the mid-19th century, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day was established by French Canadian nationalist elites to signify the existence of a distinct French and Catholic society through the use of public demonstrations. The Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society, a patriotic association founded in Montreal in 1842, mobilized resources and used the celebration as […]

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Rescued by the Americans: the Story Ottawa Conservatives would prefer Canadians not know

June 16, 2014

By Veronica Strong-Boag First of all three disclaimers: I like many Americans; I love digital records; and I value the efforts of independent on-line initiatives to serve the public good. Why then my reservations when I read the website http://parkscanadahistory.com?  Two generous residents of the lower forty-eight, with significant expertise in the US National Park […]

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Downsizing Flight Attendants in the Sky and the Deregulation and Privatization of Air Travel in Canada

June 10, 2014

By Bret Edwards Transport Canada recently announced a plan to change the number of flight attendants Canadian airlines are required to staff on specific commercial flights. The current national standard, developed in 1968, is one flight attendant for every forty passengers. If the regulation is changed, this ratio will drop to one in fifty. Airlines […]

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European Nativism Narrows the Horizons of the European Union Project

June 9, 2014

By Aitana Guia From its inception in 1950, federalists and intergovernmentalists wrestled for control of a project to unify Western Europe on economic and political terms.  For most of its six decades of existence, those who were reluctant to cease a growing share of their sovereignty to European institutions in Brussels held federalists at bay. Booming […]

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Memory at 100: The First World War Centennial and the Question of Commemoration

June 4, 2014

By Nathan Smith In a recent post here Jonathan Weier compared official plans in the UK and Australia to commemorate the First World War centennial with the Canadian government’s disengagement with the one-hundredth anniversary of the First World War.  Given the interest the federal Conservatives have shown in warrior nationalism and war commemoration, this is […]

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