European History

Feeling the City: Getting at the Historical Sights and Sounds of Downtown

October 6, 2014

Like most of us humans—80% in Canada, more than 50% worldwide—my home is in the city. And like so many urbanites, I take a whole range of day-to-day sensations for granted. The screech of garbage trucks, the overheard conversations on public transit; the smells of street food and exhaust; the sight of thousands of other […]

Read the full article →

’1914-1918 In Memoriam’: A View from the Grandstand

August 12, 2014

ActiveHistory.ca is featuring this post as the first piece for “Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca”, a multi-year series of regular posts about the history and centennial of the First World War.  By Nathan Smith A sizeable audience turned out for a First World War commemorative event held at the University of […]

Read the full article →

Call for Blog Posts – Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca

August 4, 2014

By Sarah Glassford, Christopher Schultz, Nathan Smith, and Jonathan Weier August 4th is an important day in the centennial of the First World War. It was on this day a century ago that Britain declared war on Germany, committing Canada to the “Great War” as a British Dominion, confirming its alliance with imperial France and […]

Read the full article →

European Nativism Narrows the Horizons of the European Union Project

June 9, 2014

By Aitana Guia From its inception in 1950, federalists and intergovernmentalists wrestled for control of a project to unify Western Europe on economic and political terms.  For most of its six decades of existence, those who were reluctant to cease a growing share of their sovereignty to European institutions in Brussels held federalists at bay. Booming […]

Read the full article →

The War to End All Wars: A Look Back at World War One – A Video Series from the Department of History at York University

May 2, 2014

When Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated by Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip on June 28, 1914, it set off a chain of events that became one of the deadliest combats in human history, known as the First World War. To mark the centennial of the start of this war, York University’s Department of History […]

Read the full article →

What is the “Right Way” to commemorate the First World War?

April 7, 2014

By Jonathan Weier Those who regularly read the British press have been exposed, over the past three months, to a vitriolic war of words over the legacy and meaning of the First World War in Britain.  This controversy has become increasingly acrimonious as representatives of the Conservative government and their sympathizers have sought to paint […]

Read the full article →

Why is this time Different? Political Implications of prolonged Economic Downturns

March 26, 2014

By David Zylberberg Historians place a disproportionate emphasis on the 1930s when teaching European History. The decade looms large in our courses with discussions of economic depressions, the rise of far-right political parties and the onset of the Second World War. We generally try to instill greater complexity to our lectures but a fairly straight-forward […]

Read the full article →

Preserving History as it Happens: The Internet Archive and the Crimean Crisis

March 25, 2014

By Ian Milligan “Thirty goons break into your office and confiscate your computers, your hard drives, your files.. and with them, a big chunk of your institutional memory. Who you gonna call?” These were the words Bob Garfield used in a recent episode of On the Media, to address the storming of the Crimean Center for […]

Read the full article →

Podcast – “Hunt for the Jews: Betrayal and Murder in German-Occupied Poland” by Jan Grabowski

March 14, 2014

Podcast: Play in new window | Download The Ottawa Historical Association welcomed historian Jan Grabowski in January. ActiveHistory.ca is happy to feature here his talk, “Hunt for the Jews: Betrayal and Murder in German-Occupied Poland.” Grabowski is a professor at the University of Ottawa. His talk is based on his recent book of the same […]

Read the full article →

The Aestheticization of Politics at the Olympic Games

February 17, 2014

By Eric Wright Disclaimer: I am an athlete and sports fan, despite what this article may lead you to believe. The 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics has been embroiled in controversy from the start.  The games will be the most corrupt in history based on dollar value, with an estimated one third of the games’ $51 […]

Read the full article →