History and Policy

Rescued by the Americans: the Story Ottawa Conservatives would prefer Canadians not know

June 16, 2014

By Veronica Strong-Boag First of all three disclaimers: I like many Americans; I love digital records; and I value the efforts of independent on-line initiatives to serve the public good. Why then my reservations when I read the website http://parkscanadahistory.com?  Two generous residents of the lower forty-eight, with significant expertise in the US National Park […]

Read the full article →

Eye of the Storm: History, Past and Future at the University of Saskatchewan

June 12, 2014

By Merle Massie The University of Saskatchewan has been front and center in national and international news this past spring, owing to the public fallout of an ugly internal battle regarding the university’s past and future directions. And historians have been active generals and foot soldiers on all sides of the battle. Because when you’re […]

Read the full article →

Downsizing Flight Attendants in the Sky and the Deregulation and Privatization of Air Travel in Canada

June 10, 2014

By Bret Edwards Transport Canada recently announced a plan to change the number of flight attendants Canadian airlines are required to staff on specific commercial flights. The current national standard, developed in 1968, is one flight attendant for every forty passengers. If the regulation is changed, this ratio will drop to one in fifty. Airlines […]

Read the full article →

Carpe Aqua: Asian Carp, Invasive Species, and the Great Lakes

May 22, 2014

By Daniel Macfarlane Invasive species in the Great Lakes have been a big problem for decades. From the alewife, which first appeared in the Great Lakes in the 1800s, to the zebra mussels in recent decades, the composition of the Great Lakes biomass has been constantly in flux. And the problem is about to get […]

Read the full article →

As American As Apple Pie: The Lack of Paid Parental Benefits in the United States

May 14, 2014

By Elizabeth O’Gorek My husband and I recently moved to the United States. He accepted an good job offer in a nice city. The company arranged my work visa, and there is a good benefits package. So, in preparation for working and working on a family, I thought I’d research the legislation on paid maternity […]

Read the full article →

Who? The Canadian Rangers?

May 9, 2014

Reviewed by Anne Marie Goodfellow Hands up if you’ve heard of the Canadian Rangers. Don’t worry, I hadn’t heard of them either before reading this book. The Canadian Rangers are a component of the Canadian Forces (CF) who operate at a local level with community volunteers in Canada’s sparsely populated northern and coastal areas. As […]

Read the full article →

The Value of Thinking Big: Experimenting with Pedestrian Space in Toronto, 1970s and 2014

April 28, 2014

By Daniel Ross In cities across Canada, citizens are emerging from their winter hibernation to a spring and summer season packed with street festivals, concerts, and other special events. In Toronto alone there are hundreds each year, from Salsa on St. Clair to Pride to the literary Word on the Street, and on summer weekends […]

Read the full article →

Old Conflicts in a New Century: The Problems of Prairie Grain Transportation

April 15, 2014

By Laura Larsen Few Canadians missed the news stories of grain piling up on the prairies and denunciations of the system’s failures. The Federal government’s recent announcement of financial penalties for the railways is the latest act in a long running problem facing western Canadian grain farmers: how to economically get their grain to market when […]

Read the full article →

Canada’s Presence in the World: A Discussion with the Right Honorable Joe Clark

April 2, 2014

By Andrew Sopko and Sarah Dougherty On January 31st 2014, the Right Honorable Joe Clark came to Carleton University to discuss his new book, How We Lead: Canada in a Century of Change (Random House, 2013), with students in Professor Norman Hillmer’s seminar on nationalism, internationalism, and political culture. This book, by the former prime […]

Read the full article →

Soldier Suicide after the Great War: A First Look

March 24, 2014

By Jonathan Scotland On 20 January 1919 Charles Campbell killed himself. The resident of Brockville, Ontario was the first of many veterans of the First World War to commit suicide that year. Others included Ross Puttilo, Alexander Fowler, William Bailey, and William Dowier. There would be more. Their deaths remind us that recent suicides in […]

Read the full article →