History and Policy

Why Should We Care About the Erebus (or Terror)?

September 15, 2014

by Tina Adcock On the morning of Tuesday, September 9th, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced some unexpected and astounding news: that the wreckage of one of Sir John Franklin’s ships, either the Erebus or the Terror, had been located via sonar on the bottom of Queen Maud Gulf, which lies southwest of King William Island […]

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Picking Up the Pieces: A Community-School Alternative to First Nations Education Renewal

September 12, 2014

By Paul W. Bennett and Jonathan Anuik The proposed First National Education Act has “had a great fall,” much like Humpty Dumpty in the popular children’s fable. The latest deal, announced with great fanfare by Assembly of First Nations Chief Shawn Atleo and Prime Minister Stephen Harper on February 7, 2014 may have sweetened the […]

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New Paper: Travel and Access to Abortion

August 6, 2014

With the Abortion: The Unfinished Revolution Conference beginning tomorrow, ActiveHistory.ca is proud to publish “Travel and Access to Abortion,” a paper written collectively by Nancy Janovicek, Christabelle Sethna, Beth Palmer, and Katrina Ackerman. On July 18th, the Morgentaler Clinic in Fredericton performed its last abortion. Without government funding, and the generous support of Dr. Henry Morgentaler, the […]

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Where have all the censuses gone? A Problem with Digital Data

July 28, 2014

By Thomas Peace This post is a little late in coming, but hopefully it will be useful for those of us working in pre-twentieth century North American history or with online resources. About a year ago, I discovered that one of the most useful reference resources I use, Statistics Canada’s E-Stat tables of the Censuses […]

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Rescued by the Americans: the Story Ottawa Conservatives would prefer Canadians not know

June 16, 2014

By Veronica Strong-Boag First of all three disclaimers: I like many Americans; I love digital records; and I value the efforts of independent on-line initiatives to serve the public good. Why then my reservations when I read the website http://parkscanadahistory.com?  Two generous residents of the lower forty-eight, with significant expertise in the US National Park […]

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Eye of the Storm: History, Past and Future at the University of Saskatchewan

June 12, 2014

By Merle Massie The University of Saskatchewan has been front and center in national and international news this past spring, owing to the public fallout of an ugly internal battle regarding the university’s past and future directions. And historians have been active generals and foot soldiers on all sides of the battle. Because when you’re […]

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Downsizing Flight Attendants in the Sky and the Deregulation and Privatization of Air Travel in Canada

June 10, 2014

By Bret Edwards Transport Canada recently announced a plan to change the number of flight attendants Canadian airlines are required to staff on specific commercial flights. The current national standard, developed in 1968, is one flight attendant for every forty passengers. If the regulation is changed, this ratio will drop to one in fifty. Airlines […]

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Carpe Aqua: Asian Carp, Invasive Species, and the Great Lakes

May 22, 2014

By Daniel Macfarlane Invasive species in the Great Lakes have been a big problem for decades. From the alewife, which first appeared in the Great Lakes in the 1800s, to the zebra mussels in recent decades, the composition of the Great Lakes biomass has been constantly in flux. And the problem is about to get […]

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As American As Apple Pie: The Lack of Paid Parental Benefits in the United States

May 14, 2014

By Elizabeth O’Gorek My husband and I recently moved to the United States. He accepted an good job offer in a nice city. The company arranged my work visa, and there is a good benefits package. So, in preparation for working and working on a family, I thought I’d research the legislation on paid maternity […]

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Who? The Canadian Rangers?

May 9, 2014

Reviewed by Anne Marie Goodfellow Hands up if you’ve heard of the Canadian Rangers. Don’t worry, I hadn’t heard of them either before reading this book. The Canadian Rangers are a component of the Canadian Forces (CF) who operate at a local level with community volunteers in Canada’s sparsely populated northern and coastal areas. As […]

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