History on the Internet

Preserving History as it Happens: The Internet Archive and the Crimean Crisis

March 25, 2014

By Ian Milligan “Thirty goons break into your office and confiscate your computers, your hard drives, your files.. and with them, a big chunk of your institutional memory. Who you gonna call?” These were the words Bob Garfield used in a recent episode of On the Media, to address the storming of the Crimean Center for […]

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Digital Libraries and National Digitization Programmes: How Does Canada Compare?

March 10, 2014

By Krista McCracken National digital library projects and national digitization initiatives have emerged across the world in recent years with varying levels of funding, support, and success.  How does Canada’s national attempts at digitization and open access compare to international efforts to make material freely accessible online? The example closest to home is the Digital […]

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Canada’s Historical Newspaper Digitization Problem, Part 2

February 13, 2014

By Sean Kheraj Nearly three years ago, I wrote a post called “Canada’s Historical Newspaper Digitization Problem” in which I agreed with the findings of a Higher Education Academy study that found that Canada lagged behind the US, UK, Australia, and New Zealand in the digitization of historical newspapers. I found that Canada’s online historical […]

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Why Canada’s Open Data Initiative Matters to Historians

February 3, 2014

By Ian Milligan This post originally appeared on ianmilligan.ca. OK, you’re all forgiven: when you hear ‘open data,’ the first thing that springs to mind probably isn’t a historian (to some historians, it’s the first episode of the BBC show ‘Yes, Minister’). In general, you’d be right: most open data releases tend to do with […]

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Archival Digitization and the Struggle to Create Useful Digital Reproductions

January 6, 2014

By Krista McCracken The past decade has fundamentally changed how archives provide access to historical records.  Many archives now provide digital access to collections, have digitization on demand services, and have started to prioritize collections for digitization.  Much of this digitization has been driven by funding bodies and a desire to increase accessibility to collections. […]

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On Scottish Independence – a Metis perspective

December 3, 2013

By Zoe Todd What does it mean to be a child of Empire? I’m not quite sure, but the complex roots of my ancestors stretch across small prairie towns and all the way back to Ireland, Scotland and England. I am Metis: an offspring of the fur trade and all of its complexities, paradoxes and […]

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Yonge Love: Crowd-Sourcing the History of Toronto’s Main Drag

November 4, 2013

By Daniel Ross Every Torontonian has a story about Yonge Street. For nearly a century it was the city’s unquestioned commercial and entertainment hub, the place to go for everything from window-shopping and people-watching to a Saturday night out on the town. Even in today’s diverse, dispersed Toronto it remains our most iconic street. Love […]

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The Internet Archive Rocks, or, Two Million Plus Free Sources to Explore

September 9, 2013

By Ian Milligan For many students, it’s back to school season. For me, that means it is time to think about some of the resources and tools that are out there. If you want to research a topic, it’s worth keeping in mind some great repositories online. The big one online is the Internet Archive – which […]

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Digital History isn’t for everyone

July 29, 2013

Digital History isn’t for everyone. In Canada, according to the 2010 Canadian Internet Use Survey, one-fifth of all households remain without access to the internet in the home.

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Ten Other Things You Might Not Have Known About 20th-Century Aboriginal History in Canada.

July 25, 2013

By Sean Kheraj If there was a weekly prize for active historians in Canada, Ian Mosby would have been last week’s winner. Canadian national news media (including print, radio, television, and web) prominently featured Dr. Mosby’s recently published Histoire Sociale/Social History article, “Administering Colonial Science: Nutrition Research and Human Biomedical Experimentation in Aboriginal Communities and […]

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