Category Archives: Teaching History

Bringing the Legacy of Residential Schools into the Classroom

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By Krista McCracken Teaching about an emotionally charged, important topic like residential schools can be daunting, especially if like many Canadians you weren’t exposed to residential schools in any great depth during your own education. My job includes the delivery of educational programming relating to residential schools.  This most commonly takes the form of historical tours of the Shingwauk Residential… Read more »

Techno-Feeling in the Classroom: Technology, Empathy and Learning

Beth A. Robertson Technology forms us as much as we, in turn, form technology. This is not a new idea by any means, as many scholars, from Donna Haraway to Don Ihde, have argued much the same. More than apparatuses that are used benignly to perform certain functions, technology infuses our social order, our sense of self, and how we… Read more »

Is it time for the dinosaurs to go extinct? A response to “A Brief History of the Laptop Ban”

By Gregory Kennedy Last week, as I was sitting down to write my regular contribution to ActiveHistory.ca, Sean Kheraj’s brief history of banning laptops in the classroom was published. It really struck a chord. I had been planning to write yet another piece about the commemoration of the First World War and how historians have a unique opportunity to be… Read more »

Podcast – A Scholarly Tribute to Bettina Bradbury: Feminist Historian of the Family: A Roundtable Discussion

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Tribute-to-Bradbury.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn May 26th, a group of historians gathered as part of the 2014 Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting to discuss the work of historian Bettina Bradbury. Chaired by Magda Fahrni (UQAM), the panel featured Dominique Marshall (Carleton), Mary Anne Poutanen (Concordia), Liz Millward (University of Manitoba) and Jarrett Henderson (Mount Royal). ActiveHistory.ca is pleased… Read more »

A Brief History of the Laptop Ban

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By Sean Kheraj In recent years, several scholars have expressed a desire to ban laptop computers and smartphones from the classroom. This urge to prohibit the use of computing devices, however, may be a reflection of our own shortcomings as educators. It may also be a future liability for higher education. What are the implications of excluding technologies that have… Read more »

Marking WWI with a Travelling Exhibit

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By Timothy Humphries As the official guardian of Ontario’s historical record, the Archives of Ontario is keenly aware that it must offer the public easy access to its vast and diverse holdings, and provide widespread opportunities to know more about our province’s rich and storied past. To this end, the Archives has long sought partnerships with museums, libraries, art and… Read more »

Eye of the Storm: History, Past and Future at the University of Saskatchewan

By Merle Massie The University of Saskatchewan has been front and center in national and international news this past spring, owing to the public fallout of an ugly internal battle regarding the university’s past and future directions. And historians have been active generals and foot soldiers on all sides of the battle. Because when you’re talking about shaping past and… Read more »

New Paper: Sean Carleton: Rebranding Canada with Comics

ActiveHistory.ca is pleased to announce the publication of Sean Carleton’s Rebranding Canada with Comics: Canada 1812: Forged in Fire and the Continuing Co-optation of Tecumseh: In the current age of austerity, the Harper Government allocated over $28 million to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812. For many historians this proved to be an unpopular decision. It even… Read more »

After All is Said and Done

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By Peter Seixas After all is said and done, and The Historical Thinking Project has been laid to rest, the biggest question in history education is still up for grabs.  What is history education for?  Leaving aside whether it is well taught or poorly taught, what are we aiming for?  Here is a smattering of possibilities, as they surface from… Read more »

The Need for Professional Development and Support for Teachers

By Jill Colyer When I first started teaching I didn’t feel very successful in my history classroom. (Of course, it is hard to feel successful at all when you first start teaching because the entire experience is overwhelming and incredibly difficult.) After a few years, my feeling that something was missing in my history classes hadn’t gone away. I didn’t… Read more »