Category Archives: Uncategorized

History Matters podcast: Megan Davies and David Reville on Parkdale’s mad history

Megan Davies and David Reville recently presented an engaging talk on the ways in which mental health deinstitutionalization impacted psychiatric survivors and the Parkdale neighbourhood of Toronto.  In front of a packed audience at the Parkdale library, “Locating Parkdale’s Mad History: Back Wards to Back Streets, 1980-2010” examined the motivations behind deinstitutionalization and showed how community members are remembering the… Read more »

Is Wikipedia Worth the Trouble?

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Formally launched by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger in 2001, Wikipedia — the “free encyclopedia that anyone can edit” — has become the first (and often only) stop in Internet fact-finding. With well over ten million articles to date, Wikipedia has evaded overt corporate influence through a non-profit structure and currently ranks among the top ten most visited sites on… Read more »

Craig Heron distills Toronto’s booze-soaked past at second History Matters series lecture

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Heron-History-Matters-talk.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadCanadian historian Craig Heron recently presented an entertaining talk at the second event of the History Matters lecture series, sponsored by the Toronto Public Library. Heron discussed a number of aspects in the social history of alcohol in Toronto, from the public importance of nineteenth-century taverns to the imposition of prohibition in the early… Read more »

Stuart Henderson talks hip Yorkville history at inaugural History Matters series

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Henderson-History-Matters-talk.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download Historian, journalist, and musician Stuart Henderson recently presented an engaging talk at the inaugural History Matters lecture series, sponsored by the Toronto Public Library. In front of a standing-room audience, Henderson’s “Making the Scene in 1960s Yorkville” discussed the fascinating dynamics of a hip community of beatniks, hippies, and greasers that made up one of Canada’s most… Read more »

History Matters: A lecture series connecting Toronto historians with the city and its people

by Lisa Rumiel On Tuesday, September 14th the Toronto Public Library (TPL) will kick off its 6 part History Matters lecture series.  As you might have guessed from the title, the idea for the series was inspired by what’s been going on over the past couple years with the folks at Active History – both at the blog and the… Read more »

Tuning into Canadian History

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This Canada Day, before the beers, the barbeque and the fireworks, make a little time to turn on the radio (or your computer) and learn something that you may not have known about Canadian history. Beginning 1 July 2010, CJSW 90.9 FM Radio in Calgary will begin airing its year long series “Today in Canadian History.” This daily program explores… Read more »

Giving voice to history

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by Laura Madokoro Last week, the first event by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on residential schools was held in Winnipeg. In the same week, British Prime Minister David Cameron issued an apology on behalf of the British government for the “unjustified and unjustifiable” killings of thirteen people in Londonderry, Northern Ireland in 1972 – an event now famously known… Read more »

Congo: The Most Dangerous Place in the World for Women

On 21 May 2010 Human Rights Watch (HRW) reported on a new round of mass killings and gross human rights abuses perpetrated by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DCR). This is the latest in a string of now familiar reports that are attempting to shed light on a part of the world that has… Read more »

Heli-skiing and cultural heritage in contested landscapes

by Jeff Slack A recent BBC news report highlights some of the key issues in a decades-long debate over heli-skiing in the European Alps. First experimented with in British Columbia’s interior mountain ranges in the 1960s, heli-skiing entails using helicopters in lieu of chairlifts to shuttle small, guided groups of skiers to the top of otherwise difficult-to-access, and thus untracked… Read more »

Earth Day turns 40

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Today, Earth Day celebrates its 40th anniversary.  Earth Day originated as a call to arms by US Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, who hoped to draw on the grassroots movement for greater environmental consciousness in order to bring about positive policy changes in Washington. Earth Day drew much of its early enthusiasm from university campuses.  Fittingly, then, NiCHE (Network in… Read more »