Tag Archives: Facebook

Hashtag Heritage: Social Media, Advertising and Remembrance Day

By Angela Duffett A rather curious promoted tweet from the Bank of Montreal appeared recently on my Twitter feed: “Join Canadians for a #DayofSocialSilence to honour those in service.” Not really grasping the connection between BMO, Remembrance Day, and staying off of social media for the day, I clicked the tweet to see what kind of response it was attracting…. Read more »

Podcast: Lost Ottawa: Facebook, Community, and History in the 21st Century. What Does it all Mean?

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/McGee-Lost-Ottawa-lecture.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn September 17, the Ottawa Historical Association held its first lecture of the 2013-2014 season. Kicking things off was David McGee of the Canadian Science and Technology Museum and Founder of the popular Facebook group Lost Ottawa. McGee’s talk was entitled “Lost Ottawa: Facebook, Community, and History in the 21st Century. What Does it… Read more »

A Web of History: How Digital and Social Media is Changing Heritage Awareness in Toronto

By Jay Young A common cliché of our time is to observe that the internet has made us more connected than ever.  Although historians might question the accuracy of this statement, the web, social media, and smart phone apps have allowed new opportunities for engagement with historical artifacts, stories, and landmarks. One only has to look at Canada’s largest city. … Read more »

Top 10 Tips for Managing Your Organization’s Social Media Presence

It is important to note that establishing a good social media policy is crucial before indulging in this exciting world of conversation and knowledge sharing. Most of the following points appear in the social media policy for Banting House. If you’re looking for a foundation, there are plenty social media policy templates online.

The Revolution Will Be Rubbernecked

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While the recent protest movements in the Middle East reveal much about the present state of civic community among the people of those nations — Iran, Tunisia, and Egypt (and a growing list of others) — our reaction to them reveals more about ourselves than we should perhaps find flattering.