Tag Archives: South Africa

Graffiti Is a Revolutionary Act at a South Africa University

By Rachel Hatcher [Originally published by teleSUR and the first post in a series titled “Learning and unlearning history in South Africa’s public spaces”] Students rewriting the history of South Africa on buildings and statues at the University of the Free State is an important act of restorative justice. In recent years, students in South Africa, Chile, Québec, and elsewhere,… Read more »

Climate Change on the Ground

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By Elizabeth Vibert The people of Jomela village in eastern Limpopo Province, South Africa, feel like canaries in a coal mine. The local metaphor features a snail collecting ashes. When I last visited Jomela in April and May, sixty-five-year-old vegetable farmer Daina Mahlaule told me that home food gardens in the village produced “nothing, nothing at all” in the recent… Read more »

History in the Making: Witnessing South Africa’s #FeesMustFall Campaign

By Susanne M. Klausen It’s been an exciting and inspiring week in South Africa watching the student movement #FeesMustFall in action. (The name builds on the recent successful #rhodesmustfall campaign that resulted in the removal of the Cecil Rhodes statue at the University of Cape Town, or the UCT). The students have placed the demand for free, quality education front and… Read more »

From Pretoria to Winnipeg? The Potential for Transnational Histories of Reconciliation

In 1999, Nelson Mandela declared “the day should not be far off, when we shall have a people’s shrine, a Freedom Park, where we shall honour with all the dignity they deserve, those who endured pain so we should experience the joy of freedom.” As you walk around the bustling streets of South Africa’s capital city, Pretoria, you would never… Read more »