Tag Archives: theatre

History Slam Episode Eighty-Eight: Translation and Canadian Theatre

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Nicole-Nolette.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Remember Bon Cop, Bad Cop? It was that movie set between Ontario and Quebec where the characters spoke French half the time and English half the time. During the French sequences, English subtitles would adorn the bottom of the screen and vice versa. The movie has earned a bit of a… Read more »

Hamilton: A Belated Discussion

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By Jonathan McQuarrie It turns out rap is a perfect medium for history. Hamilton has become a touchstone musical, winning laurels from a range of audiences from musical aficionados to people (like me) who are never quite sure why everyone is singing. Its wide appeal has made it a notoriously difficult ticket to get—as of this writing, the tickets are… Read more »

History Slam Episode Fifty-Three: What to Wear to the Birth of a Nation

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Laurie-Campbell.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham The story has been told thousands of time in the same way: the Fathers of Confederation met in Charlottetown and Quebec in 1864 and laid the groundwork for Confederation. These were men of vision who, according the video shown at the PEI legislature, had few major disagreements and passed the time… Read more »

Active History on Stage: Party People at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

By Daniel Ross How do we create art about history? Can we make it powerful, relevant, and pedagogical? What happens when the people whose lives and struggles we portray are still alive – and in the audience? Anyone making art about the past has to come to grips with questions like these. But it’s rare to find artists comfortable enough… Read more »

‘All the world’s a stage’: Performance in the Classroom

Performance is an important theoretical concept in the history classroom.  It has been deployed in various contexts, from a social historian’s concern with the ‘public transcript’ of the theatre of the dominant classes, and its counter-theatre of resistance, to cultural and gender historians’ readings of ‘performativity,’ wherein the cultural fictions of collectively performed gender produce and reinforce prevailing notions of normalcy. … Read more »