Opening the Academy: New Strategies for Exploring and Sharing African Nova Scotian History

BHM 2014 - Revised posterOn Friday, February 28th, a Royal Society of Canada-funded symposium will be held in the Fountain Commons at Acadia University. This Open Academy brings together scholars and members of the general public, including high school, community college, and university students and members of the African Nova Scotian descendant community. The event’s main objective is to share recent scholarly research in African Nova Scotian history with the community, and to strategize how broad, ongoing public access to new data may be facilitated in the future.

We have engaged renowned researchers and accomplished storytellers – all well-versed in Canada’s Black past – to lead discussions that will explore heritage resources that can and should frame future discussions about everything from community history to the ongoing experiences of racial discrimination to which African Nova Scotians continue to be subjected.  This symposium is an opportunity to engage scholars directly with the community in a discussion on how to establish and improve popular access to newly acquired data and how information can be made available to all Nova Scotians, to further the cause of intercultural understanding and respect.

Panel 1: 10:00 a.m.: Researching the History

  • Dr. Henry Bishop, NSCC Halifax/Dartmouth
  • Dr. Afua Cooper, James R. Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies, Dalhousie University
  • Dr. Karolyn Smardz Frost, Harrison McCain Visiting Professor, Acadia University

Panel 2: 1:00 p.m.: ‘Getting it our There’ – Sharing the History

  • Dr. Sylvia Hamilton, University of Kings College, Halifax
  • Quanda Johnson, Fullbright Fellow, Dalhousie University
  • El Jones, Poet Laureate, Halifax Regional Municipality

Panel 3: 2:45 p.m.: Educational Strategies Going Forward

  • Ken Fells, President, Black Educators Association
  • Krishinda McBride, Race Relations, Cross Cultural Understanding and Human Rights Coordinator, AVRSB
  • Dr. Leslie Oliver, Professor Emeritus, Acadia University

3 thoughts on “Opening the Academy: New Strategies for Exploring and Sharing African Nova Scotian History

  1. this will be more appreciated if for instance south Africa can be included because of its wonderful oral archival acquisitions and accessions regarding khoisan communities and battles that took place as precursor to democracy.eg the death of members of community member digging for old bottles along buffalo river in king Williamstown .

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