Tag Archives: Canadian history

Stories from coast to coast to coast: An interview with Adam Bunch

A man in a suit jacket, jeans, and hat facing away from the camera. He is looking out over a grassy landscape.

Sara Wilmshurst Author, documentarian, and educator Adam Bunch met with one of our editors to talk about his work bringing Canadian history to the masses. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. SW: One of the things that is notable about your Canadian history documentary series, Canadiana, is how much of the country you visit to make it… Read more »

History Slam 197: History Podcaster Roundtable

      No Comments on History Slam 197: History Podcaster Roundtable

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/History-Slam-197a.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham When we started the History Slam back in 2012, podcasting was still pretty new. The major platforms were hosting shows, but the analytics weren’t very good, many people had difficulty accessing episodes, and a lot of academics – including every faculty member I talked to before starting the show – didn’t… Read more »

History Slam 194: Mining Country

      No Comments on History Slam 194: Mining Country

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/History-Slam-194.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham In April 1936, three workers at the Moose River Mine in Nova Scotia became trapped over 40 metres below the ground when the mine’s roof collapsed. On the sixth day following the collapse, rescuers were able to drill a borehole that allowed them to send food and water to the men…. Read more »

In Racial Solidarity: Historicizing Anti-Asian Racism, Violence, and White Supremacy in Canada

This post by Melanie Ng[1] is part of the “(In)Security in the Time of COVID-19” series. Read the rest of the series here. Vancouver: On a cold February night in 1887, an anti-Chinese lynch mob  of white men razed a Chinese work camp. Lanterns in hand and singing the U.S. Union army marching song “John Brown’s Body,” the mob set Chinese… Read more »

History Slam 179: Civilians at the Sharp End

      No Comments on History Slam 179: Civilians at the Sharp End

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/History-Slam-179.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Every May, the City of Ottawa hosts the annual Tulip Festival to celebrate the relationships built between Canada and the Netherlands during the Second World War. Following the war, the Dutch Royal Family gifted tulips to Canada as a symbol of friendship, in part to commemorates the birth of Princess Margriet… Read more »

History Slam Episode 177: Imagining a New We

      No Comments on History Slam Episode 177: Imagining a New We

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/History-Slam-177.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Being in Ottawa, there are unique opportunities for engaging with Canada’s past. One of my favourite is to head to Parliament Hill to explore how the federal government has decided to commemorate Canada’s history. The monuments that surround the parliament buildings offer a pretty clear sign of what those in the… Read more »

History Slam Episode 175: The Burden of Gravity

      No Comments on History Slam Episode 175: The Burden of Gravity

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/History-Slam-175.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham In the 9 years we’ve being doing the History Slam, I’ve constantly been amazed by the variety of ways in which public historians tell the stories of the past. There are so many unique and powerful storytelling techniques that make great use of historical research. One such example is the new… Read more »

History Slam Episode 165: Capital Punishment, Murder, & Sexual Violence in Canada

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/History-Slam-165.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham In 1967, the federal government placed a moratorium on the death penalty in Canada. Nine years later, Bill C-64 officially abolished capital punishment. Over the previous century, 710 people were executed in Canada, but the public reaction to each of these varied. Some generated plenty of media attention, while others fell… Read more »

History Slam Episode 163: Pier 21

      No Comments on History Slam Episode 163: Pier 21

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/History-Slam-163.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Between 1928 and 1971, around 1 million immigrants arrived in Canada at Halifax’s Pier 21. In the years since its closure as a reception centre for immigration, the site has taken on a symbolic role in representing mid-century Canadian immigration, embodying the policies, procedures, and attitudes of the immigration system. The… Read more »

Miss Canadian History: An Archive Story

      No Comments on Miss Canadian History: An Archive Story

Donald Wright Archive stories are stories about, well, archives, the things that we find in them, and the things that we know we will never find. They are also invitations to reflect on how and why archival evidence – from a routinely-generated source to a single photograph – was created and what it can and can’t tell us about the… Read more »