Tag Archives: memory

Exploring the Clash of Official and Vernacular Memory: The Great War in Brantford, Brant Country, and Six Nations

By Dr. Peter Farrugia and Evan J. Habkirk The American historian, John Bodnar has argued that “Public memory emerges from the intersection of official and vernacular cultural expressions.” Official memory in his conception is propagated by elites who attempt to advance their vision “…by promoting interpretations of past and present reality that reduce the power of competing interests that threaten… Read more »

The Home Archivist – The Grand Seduction

      4 Comments on The Home Archivist – The Grand Seduction

By Jessica Dunkin In the series’ inaugural post, I gave readers a brief overview of The Home Archivist, a project in which I—a professional historian—process and arrange a collection of nineteenth-century letters. The context in which a collection was produced, what archivists refer to as provenance, is central to these practices of processing and arranging historical documents. But what of… Read more »

Call for Blog Posts – Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca

By Sarah Glassford, Christopher Schultz, Nathan Smith, and Jonathan Weier August 4th is an important day in the centennial of the First World War. It was on this day a century ago that Britain declared war on Germany, committing Canada to the “Great War” as a British Dominion, confirming its alliance with imperial France and Tsarist Russia, and making enemies… Read more »

Memory at 100: The First World War Centennial and the Question of Commemoration

By Nathan Smith In a recent post here Jonathan Weier compared official plans in the UK and Australia to commemorate the First World War centennial with the Canadian government’s disengagement with the one-hundredth anniversary of the First World War.  Given the interest the federal Conservatives have shown in warrior nationalism and war commemoration, this is surprising. From the government’s memorialization… Read more »

History Slam Episode Forty-Two: The Politics of Memory with Yves Frenette

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Yves-Frenette.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Since coming to power in 2006, the Harper government has increasingly involved itself in historical commemorations. Perhaps most famously with the War of 1812 television campaign, the government’s efforts have led to debates over what events should be commemorated and how political considerations shape the construction of social memory. Last week… Read more »

Speak, Recipe: Reading Cookbooks as Life Stories

      No Comments on Speak, Recipe: Reading Cookbooks as Life Stories

ActiveHistory.ca is on a two-week hiatus, but we’ll be back with new content in early September. During the hiatus, we’re featuring some of our favourite and most popular blog posts from this site over the past year. Thanks as always to our writers and readers!  The following post was originally featured on August 23 2012. It was also published in… Read more »

Photographing History and a Desire to See the Past in the Present

By Kaitlin Wainwright At December’s public consultations on the new Museum of Canadian History, Sean Kheraj, an assistant professor of history at York University, made a comment that stuck with me: by commemorating moments in history we actually learn as much about our present as our past. In trying to see the past through a contemporary lens, we blur history… Read more »

Speak, Recipe: Reading Cookbooks as Life Stories

      15 Comments on Speak, Recipe: Reading Cookbooks as Life Stories

By Ian Mosby As a historian of food and nutrition, I’ve amassed a substantial collection of cookbooks, old and new, over the years. But one cookbook I often find myself coming back to amidst the hundred plus dusty volumes cluttering my office is a 1930 edition of the Good Housekeeping Institute’s Meals Tested, Tasted and Approved: Favorite Recipes and Menus… Read more »

Oblivion stalks Postal Station K

      2 Comments on Oblivion stalks Postal Station K

by Tom Cohen “Postal Station K!” Poetic resonance: none! Just one more slightly surplus postal station – in this age of electronic mail, a property easily unloaded, after all. A splendid spot on Yonge Street, in booming North Toronto, just perfect for a big condominium, with a shopping podium at sidewalk level. So sell it, right! Now wait a minute…. Read more »