Tag Archives: Ottawa

On Wreaths and Graffiti: Reading Defacement and Nostalgia at Ottawa Monuments

Active History is proud to present a video each week from New Directions in Active History. The conference took place at Huron University College on October 2-4, 2015 and brought together scholars, students, professionals and community members to discuss a wide range of topics pertaining to active history. This week’s video marks the last video post from the 2015 Active… Read more »

The Central Experimental Farm’s Inclusion on Endangered Heritage Place List is a Call to Action

By Pete Anderson On May 26th, Heritage Canada The National Trust included an important Ottawa site in its annual list of Canada’s top ten endangered heritage places. Declaring that “the Feds play fast and loose with a national historic site,” the National Trust denounced the proposed severing of 60 acres of the Central Experimental Farm’s Field 1 for a future… Read more »

The Allumettières in Sites of Collective Remembering

      2 Comments on The Allumettières in Sites of Collective Remembering

 By Conrad McCallum There has been a renewed interest in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century story of the female match workers at the former E.B. Eddy Match Factory in Hull, Quebec. For me, this is another good example of recent efforts to regionally situate the big themes of social history in Canada. It also illustrates the challenges of trying to… Read more »

Vacating Science and Forgetting History at the Central Experimental Farm

By Peter Anderson On November 3rd, John Baird announced that Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada transferred approximately 24 hectares (60 acres) of the Central Experimental Farm, in Ottawa, to the National Capital Commission. The NCC in turn offered to lease the land to the Ottawa Hospital to build a new Civic Campus. The Hospital then mused about the using this new land… Read more »

History Slam Episode Fifteen: Placing Memory

      1 Comment on History Slam Episode Fifteen: Placing Memory

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Placing-Memory-Edit.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Over the past few months, the City of Ottawa has started to make progress on its redevelopment of Lansdowne Park. The plans new condos, retail outlets, and major renovations to Frank Claire Stadium in order to welcome a CFL franchise to the capital next spring. The project has been hotly contested,… Read more »

History Slam Episode Seven with Jim Dean: Ottawa’s Haunted Walk

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Haunted-Walk-Edited.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham With Halloween just around the corner the History Slam decided to get into the spirit and explore the world of ghost tours! In the first half of the podcast I chat with Jim Dean of Ottawa’s Haunted Walk about how they put together their stories and the importance of historical accuracy. In… Read more »

Cold War Memorial Event in Ottawa: November 16th

      No Comments on Cold War Memorial Event in Ottawa: November 16th

As part of the celebrations dedicated to its 50th anniversary, the Diefenbunker, Canada’s Cold War Museum invites you to the fourth annual Cold War Memorial Event on Wednesday, November 16, from 5:00 pm – 8:30 pm. David Monteyne, Associate Professor in Architecture at the University of Calgary, will deliver a public lecture to officially launch his new book Fallout Shelter:… Read more »

Call for Proposals: “Knowing your Public(s)—The Significance of Audiences in Public History”

“Knowing your Public(s)—The Significance of Audiences in Public History” 2013 Annual Meeting, National Council on Public History Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, April 17-20, 2013 In 2013 the National Council on Public History will meet at the Delta Ottawa City Centre, in the heart of downtown Ottawa, Canada, with Canada’s Parliament buildings, historic ByWard market, national museums and historic sites, river trails,… Read more »

Summertime in the City: Time for History in the City

A look at some national historic sites in Canada, how well (or unwell) the nation’s capital reflects these, and a call for broader participation in sites of heritage and memory.