Tag Archives: War

National Disunity and the Meaning of Vimy Ridge

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By Matt Barrett Attempting to identify the historical significance of Vimy Ridge for the general public, many historians, writers and politicians have often resorted to a nationalistic framework that depicts the battle as a vital step in the creation of an independent Canada. From April 9th to 12th 1917, the four Canadian Divisions fought together for the first time and… Read more »

Raising ‘Human Ammunition’: Motherhood, Propaganda, and the Great War

By Suzanne Evans It’s no coincidence the monolithic “Mother Canada” statue proposed for the controversial war memorial on Cape Breton (and discussed in previous ActiveHistory posts here, here, and here) is the figure of a woman. Although women make only rare appearances in public memorials to the Great War, the “Mother Canada” statue evokes a long and potent tradition of both state… Read more »

Heritage vs. History in the Commemoration of War in Cape Breton Highlands National Park

While history strives to uncover the many voices that make up the chorus of years gone by, heritage simply gives a platform to the voice that yells the loudest. And therein lies both its appeal and its shortcomings. If history is messy, heritage is clean; if history is difficult, heritage is easy.

A Monument to the Past? The Never Forgotten National War Memorial Project

By Jill Campbell-Miller Over this past winter and spring, the controversy around the proposed Never Forgotten National War Memorial Project has become increasingly intense, even reaching the pages of the Guardian. The project, sponsored by the Never Forgotten National Memorial Foundation, and specifically, Toronto businessman Tony Trigiani, intends to honour fallen soldiers who served abroad. Positioned overlooking the Atlantic Ocean… Read more »

Hashtag Heritage: Social Media, Advertising and Remembrance Day

By Angela Duffett A rather curious promoted tweet from the Bank of Montreal appeared recently on my Twitter feed: “Join Canadians for a #DayofSocialSilence to honour those in service.” Not really grasping the connection between BMO, Remembrance Day, and staying off of social media for the day, I clicked the tweet to see what kind of response it was attracting…. Read more »

Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies

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Rhonda L. Hinther It was by a mere two hours that eleven-year-old Myron Shatulsky missed seeing his beloved father, internee Matthew Shatulsky, when the train transferring Matthew and his comrades from the Kananaskis Internment Camp to Petawawa passed through Winnipeg earlier than anticipated on a July day in 1941. Myron had not seen his father since the RCMP hauled him… Read more »

New paper – Victory in the Kitchen: Food Control in the Lakehead during the Great War by Beverly Soloway

By Beverly Soloway In the summer of 1914, the twin cities of Fort William and Port Arthur, similar to the rest of Canada, thought the “European war” would be a short one.[1] When Christmas came and went without any sign of peace, most Canadians just redefined their idea of “short.” Nonetheless, by spring 1915, Lakehead households were becoming concerned about… Read more »

A Canadian Observing the Great War Centenary in London, UK

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By Christopher Schultz A kangaroo burger beckoned from the menu. It was a small taste of the exotic in London’s Mile End area, which is known primarily today as the site of Queen Mary, University of London’s main campus. After the third of four long days discussing “Perspectives on the ‘Great’ War,” an exotic burger seemed like a nice reward…. Read more »

‘1914-1918 In Memoriam’: A View from the Grandstand

ActiveHistory.ca is featuring this post as the first piece for “Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca”, a multi-year series of regular posts about the history and centennial of the First World War.  By Nathan Smith A sizeable audience turned out for a First World War commemorative event held at the University of Toronto’s Varsity Stadium this past… Read more »

Podcast: Ian McKay’s “War, Memory and Reaction: Reshaping History in Harper’s Canada”

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/McKay-War-Memory-and-Reaction-Reshaping-History-in-Harpers-Canada.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadActiveHistory.ca is happy to present a recording of Ian McKay’s talk, “War, Memory and Reaction: Reshaping History in Harper’s Canada.” McKay delivered the talk to the First Unitarian Congregation in Ottawa as the 2013 Holtom Lecture.