Tag Archives: Jennifer Bonnell

Jennifer Bonnell on the history of prisons, pollution, and homelessness in Toronto’s Don River valley: History Matters series podcast

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Bonnell-History-Matters-talk.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadHistorian Jennifer Bonnell recently gave a talk called “Isolating Undesirables: Prisons, Pollution and Homelessness in Toronto’s Don River Valley, 1860-1932” at the Berndale branch of the Toronto Public Library.   The lecture is part of the Toronto Public Library’s History Matters series. The lecture is based on research for Bonnell’s PhD dissertation, which examined… Read more »

History Matters: A lecture series connecting Toronto historians with the city and its people

by Lisa Rumiel On Tuesday, September 14th the Toronto Public Library (TPL) will kick off its 6 part History Matters lecture series.  As you might have guessed from the title, the idea for the series was inspired by what’s been going on over the past couple years with the folks at Active History – both at the blog and the… Read more »

Active History Announcements June 5 – 12

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The following upcoming events may be of interest to our readers:NiCHE job posting, News from the CHA, CIHC history and heritage, Approaching the Past, PSAT General Meeting.

Active History Announcements: May 9-15

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The following upcoming events may be of interest to our readers: Approaching the past, Active History lunch, History and Heritage in Brantford, Digest of blog posts.

Jane’s Walks: community history tours

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Since 2007 people have come together once a year to celebrate and remember the life of Jane Jacobs by leading or participating in walking tours of their local communities.  As Jacobs argued, walkability is essential for urban communities.  These tours seem to be a truly fitting monument to Jacob’s legacy.  The walks began in Toronto, but have since spread well… Read more »