Category Archives: Popular Publishing

James Marsh Retires from The Canadian Encyclopedia

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This post originally appeared March 29 2013 on the TCE Blog by the Canadian Encyclopedia By James Marsh I really had the best job in the country, as editor of Canada’s national encyclopedia. It was kismet for a boy whose irritated mother sarcastically called him “know it all!” As a kid in West End Toronto, I was obsessed with the… Read more »

Video Contest: 2013 National Council on Public History Annual Meeting in Ottawa

Coming to the 2013 National Council on Public History Annual Meeting in Ottawa this spring? Enter to win our video contest! Prizes are from NCPH and Canada’s History. Create a 1-2 minute video introducing yourself and your audience (our theme this year is “Knowing your Public(s)—The Significance of Audiences in Public History”), post your video to Youtube and email us… Read more »

TV Documentary Explores Shipbuilding Legacy in the Maritimes

It’s a chapter of history mostly forgotten, not just across Canada but even in the Maritime provinces themselves. Shipbuilding – like fishing – is an obvious fact of life on the Atlantic coast, but few people today know just how extensive the industry once was. There was a time not that long ago when men built ships in sheltered harbours,… Read more »

The Acknowledgments Project; or, The Girl with the Chocolate-Dipped Cone

By Alan MacEachern Once in a while, historians come up with an idea, do some research, analyze it, write that up, and find we have something resembling a book. Or maybe it turns out to be an article. Or a blog post. In those cases, we attach our name to it and send it out into the world. But what… Read more »

Hark! An Agent of Historical Change (and Jokes)

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by Ian Mosby Historians are not usually known as being a very funny group of people. I can’t remember laughing out loud even once during the dozen or so hours it took me to read E.P. Thomson’s Making of the English Working Class and my own attempts at humour in lectures typically lead to more glazed eyes and groans than… Read more »

New Paper: Alan MacEachern’s “A Polyphony of Synthesizers: Why Every Historian of Canada Should Write a History of Canada”

ActiveHistory.ca is happy to announce its first paper of 2012: “A Polyphony of Synthesizers: Why Every Historian of Canada Should Write a History of Canada,” by Alan MacEachern. Here is Alan’s introductory blurb: The following was my contribution to a 2010 Canadian Historical Association roundtable, “So What IS the Story? Exploring Fragmentation and Synthesis in Current Canadian Historiography.” In it,… Read more »

The Sound of History

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Podcast: Play in new window | Download A few months ago the American Radio Works posted a very interesting podcast on the art of making radio documentaries.  The podcast included a live presentation given by Stephen Smith and John Biewen about a new book Reality Radio: Telling True Stories in Sound.  While the whole discussion is very interesting, the second… Read more »

Protect Your Copyright

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By Adam Crymble Keep it, sell it or release it to everyone? Copyright isn’t a topic of which many young academics have a strong understanding. But, as a writer, it’s something to which you should pay attention. And you shouldn’t be afraid to assert your rights when it comes to assigning copyright when you publish. Your copyright is your ownership… Read more »