Indigenous Histories

This theme week, edited by Crystal Fraser, explores questions such as: What are the implications of sharing our research? How can we convey to readers that these are not ‘controversial issues’, but our lived experiences? What role should my own community play in my research? Where do I, as an Indigenous person, fit into academia – a system built and maintained on white privilege and settler colonialism? It initially ran in January 2016.

Crystal Fraser, Politics and Personal Experiences: An Editor’s Introduction to Indigenous Research in Canada

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, A Smudgier Dispossession is Still Dispossession

Zoe Todd, Conversations with my Father’s paintings: writing my relations back into the academy

Claire Thomson, Holding Our Lands and Places: The Everyday Politics of Indigenous Land and Identity

Daniel Sims, “Not That Kind of Indian:” The Problem with Generalizing Indigenous Peoples in Contemporary Scholarship and Pedagogy

Adam Gaudry, Paved with Good Intentions: Simply Requiring Indigenous Content is Not Enough

Anna Huard, A Wrench in the Medicine Wheel: The Price of Stolen Water on Indigenous Cultural Continuity

Norma Dunning, Strengthening the Nunavut Educational System

Lianne Charlie, Together Today for Our Children Tomorrow: The Next Generation of Yukon Indigenous Politics

Billy-Ray Belcourt, Political Depression in a Time of Reconciliation

Mary Jane McCallum, When History Needs an Intervention

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