Tag Archives: historical fiction

Deconstructing Children’s History Books: Residential Schools

By Samantha Cutrara Children’s historical books can serve many purposes. They can teach children about history, as well as develop emotion and empathy about figures from the past. In “Recreating the Past,” Evelyn Freeman and Linda Levstik argue that children’s historical fiction fosters ongoing process of historical interpretation in which the child is an active participant (pg. 331). From my own experience… Read more »

Sexing Up Canada’s First World War

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By Zachary Abram Canadian cultural memory of the First World War is conspicuously asexual considering Canadians had among the highest rates for venereal disease in the British Expeditionary Force, with an infection rate that reached as high as 28.7%. [1] Anyone with a passing interest in the First World War is familiar with Trench Foot and its symptoms are synonymous… Read more »

History Slam Episode Forty-One: Race, Identity, and Newfoundland Culture in Robert Chafe’s Oil and Water

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Oil-and-Water.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham On February 18, 1942 off the coast of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland, the USS Truxton and the USS Pollux ran aground in the midst of a harsh winter storm. Of the 389 sailors on both ships, only 186 survived. Of those, one stood out: Lanier Phillips. After being rescued by a group… Read more »

History Slam Episode Thirty-Four: Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch and Underground Soldier

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Marsha.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham For as much as history may fall under the ‘Humanities,’ occasionally the humanity of the past gets lost. Writing about the past can become clinical and historians can become immune to some of history’s horrors. Facts and figures of deaths in a war, for example, are faceless and can fail to… Read more »

History Slam Podcast Episode Thirty-One: Don Cummer, Brothers At War, and Historical Fiction

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Don-Cummer.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham I can understand if there are people who scoff at the thought of another book on the War of 1812. Given the onslaught of commemoration of the war over the past two years, I’ve definitely sensed some fatigue on the part of some historians. From the television commercials to museum exhibitions… Read more »

Historical Fiction as a Gateway Drug

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By Jeffers Lennox I can trace my interest in the past to a single book: Jack Whyte’s The Skystone, a story set in the time of the legendary King Arthur.  First published in 1992, when I was 12, The Skystone had just about everything necessary to hook a young kid: historical imagination, magic, war, heroism, and enough “adult” subject matter… Read more »

A Novel Approach to Connecting Young Canadians with the Past: Leaders and Legacies Series

Is historical fiction a useful approach for connecting young Canadians with the past?