Tag Archives: Community

Co-operative Agriculture – What’s Old is News

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By Sean Graham Co-operative Agriculture | RSS.com Catharine Wilson joins me to talk about the history of co-operative work bees in rural Canada. Communal events to complete big projects in short amount of time, work bees are representative of rural Canadian culture and are the subject of Catharine’s new book Being Neighbours: Cooperative Work and Rural Culture, 1830-1960. We chat… Read more »

Substance Use, Overdose Deaths, & Shared Humanity: What’s Old is News

By Sean Graham Substance Use, Overdose Deaths, & Shared Humanity | RSS.comIn this episode, I explore the history of substance use disorders and overdose deaths in Canada, which have regularly be presented through a moral lens. By othering those experiencing substance use disorders, policymakers have created an environment where ensuring support is available to users and their families is not… Read more »

Food First, Then Archives: Precarity and Community Memory

This post by Lilian Radovac and Simon Vickers is part of the “(In)Security in the Time of COVID-19” series. Read the rest of the series here. Alternative Toronto is a DIY digital archive and exhibition space that documents the history of alternative communities in the Greater Toronto Area from 1980 to 1999. As archive director and volunteer coordinator for Alternative… Read more »

Sewell and the Septics: The Government Commission that Tried to Give Community Planning Back to Communities

David M. K. Sheinin In early December 2020, former Toronto mayor and federal Progressive Conservative cabinet minister David Crombie resigned as chair of the Ontario Greenbelt Council. Created in 2005, the Council advises the provincial Minister of Municipal Affairs on maintaining the Southern Ontario Greenbelt. As the COVID-19 second wave loomed large, Crombie’s announcement won little media play. But the… Read more »

Making the Best of It, Then and Now

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Sarah Glassford and Amy Shaw A week or two into our respective COVID-19 isolations at home in Alberta and Ontario, we (colleagues Amy and Sarah) each received, by mail, fresh from the printer, our copies of our new edited collection about female Canadians’ and Newfoundlanders’ experiences of the Second World War. The title – a last minute substitution at the… Read more »

In memory of Jarrett Rudy (1970-2020), friend and colleague

(This week, historians across Canada are mourning the loss of an exceptional person and colleague, Jarrett Rudy (McGill), who passed away at his home in Montréal on 4 April 2020). Magda Fahrni Jarrett and I were the same age, both born in the fall of 1970. Over the 20 years that we knew each other and worked together on various… Read more »

Holding Our Lands and Places: The Everyday Politics of Indigenous Land and Identity

By Claire Thomson   On a warm September day, I looked down into a coulee from where my horse and I stood on a breezy prairie hill. Eight heifers crashed through the coulee, making a trail through the brush one after another. This was a tricky pasture to navigate since the hills are steep and rocky and also dense, filled with… Read more »

Urban Transformations: An Avenue For Academic Work in the Community

By Jay Young and Daniel Ross Toronto’s St. Clair Avenue West is an important transit and economic artery as well as the hub for several of the city’s most diverse and dynamic neighbourhoods. Historically it was a key east-west axis for development in Toronto northof Bloor Street, and today the street continues to grow and change in step with the… Read more »

Community Engagement in Commemoration

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By Krista McCracken Museums, galleries, parks and other heritage sites play a significant role in commemoration.  Exhibitions present specific ways of looking at history and attribute significance to particular historical events.  Commemoration at heritage sites might take place in the form of a dedicated memorial site such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum or the September 11th Memorial and… Read more »

Podcast: Lost Ottawa: Facebook, Community, and History in the 21st Century. What Does it all Mean?

https://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/McGee-Lost-Ottawa-lecture.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadOn September 17, the Ottawa Historical Association held its first lecture of the 2013-2014 season. Kicking things off was David McGee of the Canadian Science and Technology Museum and Founder of the popular Facebook group Lost Ottawa. McGee’s talk was entitled “Lost Ottawa: Facebook, Community, and History in the 21st Century. What Does it… Read more »