Category Archives: Announcements

Holiday Hiatus

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ActiveHistory.ca is on a hiatus for the winter break, with a return to daily posts in early January. Thank you to all our contributors, guest writers, guest editors, and readers for making 2015 a very successful year. Happy holidays to all and we look forward to continuing our work in 2016!

The University of Victoria History Department’s Refugee Campaign

Over the past few days the History Department at the University of Victoria has been circulating the following opportunity and challenge among historians in Canada. We have reprinted it here for the interest of our readers and as a great illustration of what we envision as Active History.    Dear Fellow Historians, No group can better appreciate the historical significance… Read more »

The Future of Loyalist Studies

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As part of our partnership with the new early Canadian history blog Borealia, we’ll be posting highlights from that website here every Saturday in November. By Christopher F. Minty “Intractable issues vex loyalist studies.” These were the words Ruma Chopra used in an essay, published in History Compass, in 2013. She’s right. As of mid-2015, loyalist studies has come to an important juncture,… Read more »

Being Part of Something Larger: A Review of Imprinting Britain

As part of our partnership with the new early Canadian history blog Borealia, we’ll be posting highlights from that website here every Saturday in November. By Keith Grant Michael Eamon, Imprinting Britain: Newspapers, Sociability, and the Shaping of British North America (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015). “Were I to name the most striking peculiarity of our neighbours in the… Read more »

Unrest, Violence, and the Search for Social Order in British North America and Canada, 1749-1876

As part of our partnership with the new early Canadian history blog Borealia, we’ll be posting highlights from that website here every Saturday in November. By Elizabeth Mancke From the mid-eighteenth century to the early Confederation era, British North Americans and then Canadians confronted a wide range of phenomena that could engender disorder: imperial wars, rebellions, the arrival of immigrants, epidemics,… Read more »

Exploring New Directions in Active History

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Tom Peace & Daniel Ross Seven years in, it’s time to take stock of the Active History project. Since our founding symposium in 2008, Active History has branched off in a number of directions. Those include–but are not limited to–an annual lecture series (History Matters), a long-running podcast (History Slam), and a working group within the Canadian Historical Association. And… Read more »

Introducing Borealia

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By Keith Grant and Denis McKim It was a packed house in Ottawa this summer for a Canadian Historical Association session entitled, “Who Killed Pre-Confederation Canadian History?” The large turnout and energetic Q & A period seemed to belie the title’s sense of demise: the history of early “Canada” appears to be alive and kicking. Tom Peace and Robert Englebert,… Read more »

New Directions in Active History: Update #2

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Conference planning for October’s event is going well and we have a handful of updates for you. First and most importantly, if you have not yet registered, the rate is going up on 1 September (Tuesday).  You can access the registration form here:  http://activehistory.ca/conf/registration/ Also, our preferred rate at the Delta ends on 4 September. The Delta is in downtown… Read more »

Our Bodies and Inescapable Ecologies: A Look at the Mining Community of Sudbury, Ontario

By Kaleigh Bradley “Where does the body end and ‘non-human nature’ begin? When we recognize that human bodies are directly affected by their environments, we are forced to acknowledge that humans are not simply agents of environmental change, but objects of that change” – Linda Nash, Inescpable Ecologies Last week I was surprised to hear about the toxic leak of… Read more »

The Second Battle of Ypres and the Creation of a YMCA Hero

ActiveHistory.ca is on a three-week hiatus, but we’ll be back with new content in next week. This week, we’ve asked the editors of Canada’s First World War to select some of their most popular and favourite posts.  This essay was originally posted on 12 May 2015  By Jonathan Weier Among the approximately 2000 members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force killed at the… Read more »