Tag Archives: Active History

Communities of Interest and Electoral Redistricting

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By David Zylberberg Following the census, Canada’s federal electoral districts are redrawn every decade. On Monday, Ontario’s proposed new ridings were announced, the last province to do so. You can look at the details of the proposed new ridings or the process of consultation, here. The proposed changes have led me to think about the origins and rationale for electoral… Read more »

History Slam Episode Four with Emily Harrington, “Publishing Guru”

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Fall-Book-Preview-Edited.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham It’s the History Slam Fall Book Preview! Emily Harrington, the podcast’s official ‘publishing guru,’ stops by to talk about some of the new books coming out in the next few months. We also talk about what we’d like to see in new history books and give a bit of insight in… Read more »

‘Not a Matter of Statistics:’ The HPV Vaccine Controversy, Promiscuity, and the History of Women, Children and Youth

By Angela Rooke For several years now, school boards across the country have been providing the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to girls and young women. But it seems the debate is just getting fired up, especially in Calgary, where the top Catholic Bishop successfully urged many Catholic schools to refuse to administer the vaccine on the grounds that it leads… Read more »

Introducing the History Slam Podcast: First Episode

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/History-Slam-Premier-Edition.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Subscribe to the podcast (iTunes coming soon). As someone who studies the history of radio, it is a little embarrassing to admit that I spend just as much time listening to podcasts as I do the radio. For me, the ability to listen when I want, where I want, and on… Read more »

The Public’s Role in Active History

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by Jeffers Lennox Historians of Canada specifically, and academics generally, have found themselves of late at the business end of some harsh criticisms.  To believe the editorials in major newspapers, academics write about obscure topics for the benefit of a small handful of other academics; we find students and teaching to be a distraction from our esoteric research projects; and… Read more »

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Visualizing the Past

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I have recently been trying to figure out good ways of representing large amounts of historical information in a way that makes sense to everybody who might stumble across my work! I think that a good graphic has the ability to draw readers into what we do, letting us convey the scope, joy, or horror of history without needing to… Read more »

War Resisters Conference Report Back Looking Back, Moving Forward: War Resisters in North America

By: Luke Stewart The conference Looking Back, Moving Forward: War Resisters in North America took place at Steelworkers Hall in Toronto, Ontario, on Friday September 23 and Saturday September 24, 2011. The gathering addressed the plight of American war resisters who fled to Canada from 2004 to the present by providing a historical context for the roots of war resistance… Read more »

Call for Proposals: “Knowing your Public(s)—The Significance of Audiences in Public History”

“Knowing your Public(s)—The Significance of Audiences in Public History” 2013 Annual Meeting, National Council on Public History Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, April 17-20, 2013 In 2013 the National Council on Public History will meet at the Delta Ottawa City Centre, in the heart of downtown Ottawa, Canada, with Canada’s Parliament buildings, historic ByWard market, national museums and historic sites, river trails,… Read more »

Announcement: History on the Grand – People and Place

Join us for a day of history and heritage in beautiful downtown Cambridge on Saturday 22 October 2011 for the local history symposium History on the Grand: People and Place.

What will the future history of today look like? Digital literacy for the next generation.

Ian Milligan argues that we will need to make dramatic changes to history undergraduate curriculums by aggressively implementing digital literacy programmes. This will benefit both our students and the historical profession.