Tag Archives: Canada

Lessons Learned from Twelve Months of COVID-19 Data Activism in Canada

This post by Alex Luscombe and Alexander McClelland is part of the “(In)Security in the Time of COVID-19” series. Read the rest of the series here. In the fall of 2019, the world saw the emergence and global spread of a new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) capable of causing acute respiratory syndrome (COVID-19) in humans. First appearing in Wuhan, China, COVID-19 quickly spread… Read more »

History Slam 183: American Refugees

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http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/History-Slam-183.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham On January 1, 2015, Rita Shelton Deverell landed at Miami International Airport from Santiago, Chile for what was scheduled to be a brief layover on her way back home to Toronto. When US border agents scanned her passport, they noticed that it listed her birthplace as Houston, Texas. A Canadian citizen… Read more »

The Perils of Digital Humanities for Academics

Dominique Clément Why does historical training at universities place so little emphasis on research methods? The rise of digital humanities presents a fundamental challenge to how we train historians. But for anyone pondering a career in academia, it’s a perilous journey where the risks might not be worth the rewards. We are in the digital age yet historical research remains… Read more »

Between Postwar & Present Day: The Possibilities and Perils of Contemporary History

Kevin Brushett, Sarah Nickel and Nancy Janovicek We live in polarized times. After preaching for years that “the world needed more Canada” because of our “exceptional” ability to politely navigate the politics of diversity, Canadians no longer seem immune to the forces of division and dissatisfaction that have led to Brexit, to Trumpism, or to a myriad of other worrying… Read more »

History Slam 179: Civilians at the Sharp End

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http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/History-Slam-179.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Every May, the City of Ottawa hosts the annual Tulip Festival to celebrate the relationships built between Canada and the Netherlands during the Second World War. Following the war, the Dutch Royal Family gifted tulips to Canada as a symbol of friendship, in part to commemorates the birth of Princess Margriet… Read more »

History Slam Episode 177: Imagining a New We

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http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/History-Slam-177.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Being in Ottawa, there are unique opportunities for engaging with Canada’s past. One of my favourite is to head to Parliament Hill to explore how the federal government has decided to commemorate Canada’s history. The monuments that surround the parliament buildings offer a pretty clear sign of what those in the… Read more »

History Slam Episode 175: The Burden of Gravity

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http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/History-Slam-175.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham In the 9 years we’ve being doing the History Slam, I’ve constantly been amazed by the variety of ways in which public historians tell the stories of the past. There are so many unique and powerful storytelling techniques that make great use of historical research. One such example is the new… Read more »

History Slam Episode 174: Captain Cook Rediscovered

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http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/History-Slam-174.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham Captain James Cook sailed with British Royal Navy through the middle of the 18th century, travelling to Newfoundland, where he made detailed maps, before making three trips to the Pacific Ocean. These travels cemented his place in the European historical narrative, as he was the first recorded European to land on… Read more »

History Slam Episode 171: A Canadian Activist in Spain’s Civil War

http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/History-Slam-171.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham In 1937, following the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, the Mackenzie King government passed the Foreign Enlistment Act. Like other western democratic countries, Canada had decided to stay out the war, which saw the democratically-elected Republican government fight against the Francisco Franco-led Nationalists. Despite the law, over 1,600 Canadians went… Read more »

History Slam Episode 170: Being Fat

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http://activehistory.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/History-Slam-170.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadBy Sean Graham In 1984, Participaction ran a television commercial telling viewers that “fat is not where it’s at.” Produced long before the “keep fit and have fun’ messages of Hal Johnson and Joanne McLeod, the ad has been cited as an example of fat shaming in Canadian culture. Instead of ideas of ‘movement… Read more »