Tag Archives: Commemoration

Podcast: Ian McKay and What’s Wrong With Flanders Fields

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This past Remembrance Day, historian Ian McKay gave a lecture titled “What’s Wrong With Flanders Fields.” He argues that Remembrance Day in general and the poem in particular have been conscripted as part of what he calls the “right-wing militarization of Canadian society.” McKay delivered the talk to the Queen’s University Institute for Lifelong Learning on November 11, 2012. You… Read more »

Myth-making and the Non-Commemoration of the War of 1812

By Greg Kennedy The government is trying really hard to make Canadians feel like the War of 1812 was important.  Variations of these themes announced on the government’s website, 1812.gc.ca, are routinely expressed by politicians, directors of heritage sites and members of local historical societies: “Canada would not exist had the American invasion of 1812-15 been successful.” The war “set… Read more »

What’s Wrong With Celebrating the War of 1812?

This is the third in a weekly series of posts leading up to the mini-conference The War of 1812: Whose War was it Anyway? being held at the University of Waterloo on May 30th. By Ian McKay and Jamie Swift Warmonger politicians customarily indulge in high rhetoric, attempting to rally the citizenry round the flag and boost the bloodletting. Or… Read more »

Remembering the Night to Remember: Titanic in Public Memory

by Mike Commito This week marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the luxury ocean liner, R.M.S. Titanic. The vessel was on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City when it struck an iceberg on the night of 14 April 1912, sinking in the early hours of the morning. The ship was supposed to make history through… Read more »

New Podcast: Christine McLaughlin on General Motors, History Making, and Power in Oshawa, Ontario

“Sam McLaughlin’s name continues to loom large over the city of Oshawa.  But the stories of working people offer alternate versions of history.  Spaces in the city ought to be made for commemorating and remembering these stories,” historian Christine McLaughlin (no relation to Sam) recently argued during her talk at a local library in Toronto.  McLaughlin’s presentation, “Producing History in… Read more »

Memento Mori On the Web: What Happens When Photos are Digitized?

An exploration of how digitization changes the context of photography, with a particular emphasis on post-mortem photography.

2010 is Year of the British Home Child in Canada but Some Descendants Want More from Ottawa

The Government of Canada has declared 2010 to be the Year of the British Home Child.  Earlier this month, Canada Post released a commemorative stamp to honour this recognition. The stamp, designed by Debbie Adams of Adams+Associates Design Consultants, contains three images: the SS Sardinian, on which home children migrated from Britain to Canada; a photograph of a home child… Read more »

Remembering and Commemorating a Complicated Past

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In this post, I look at controversies surrounding a statue of Nellie McClung, due to her early-20th century support of eugenics.