Category Archives: Series

The Abortion Caravan and Anti-Vietnam War Activism

[Editors Note: This is the second of a series of five posts on the Abortion Caravan that will be running this month.]   By Shannon Stettner Often when we study activism surrounding an issue like abortion, we do so in isolation, paying little attention to the multiple protest identities of activists. While I hadn’t anticipated writing an article on connecting abortion… Read more »

The Women Are Coming; The Abortion Caravan of 1970

[Editors Note: This is the first of a series of five posts on the Abortion Caravan that will be running this month.] By Christabelle Sethna and Shannon Stettner On April 27, 1970, members of the Vancouver Women’s Caucus (VWC) set off on a journey to Ottawa in an “Abortion Caravan” to protest the new abortion law. Under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau,… Read more »

Did You Know the American World War I Museum is in Kansas City?

By Jeff Bowersox I found out about the National World War I Museum during a recent conference trip – yes, to Kansas City. I was curious to see how it would memorialise a conflict that, for most Americans, is greatly overshadowed by its successor, and decided to visit. The museum is intertwined with the Liberty Memorial, dedicated in 1926 to… Read more »

Jean Baptiste Assiginack: The Starling aka Blackbird

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By Alan Corbiere This post marks the third in a series of essays – posted the second Wednesday of each month – by Alan Corbiere focusing on Anishinaabeg participation in the War of 1812.  On the morning of October 5, 1861, 96 year old Odaawaa Chief Jean Baptiste Assiginack of the Biipiigwenh (Sparrowhawk) clan rose from his slumber and got… Read more »

Mookomaanish: The Damn Knife (Odaawaa Chief and Warrior)

By Alan Corbiere This post marks the second in a series of essays – posted the second Wednesday of each month – by Alan Corbiere focusing on Anishinaabeg participation in the War of 1812.  At the commencement of the War of 1812, the British were not totally certain that the Western Confederacy (including the Anishinaabeg: Ojibwe, Odaawaa and Potowatomi) would… Read more »

Anishnaabeg in the War of 1812: More than Tecumseh and his Indians

By Alan Corbiere This post marks the first in a series of essays – posted the second Wednesday of each month – by Alan Corbiere focusing on Anishinaabeg participation in the War of 1812. A modified version of these posts originally appeared in the July 2012 edition of the Ojibway Cultural Foundation newsletter. It is well known that the Anishinaabeg… Read more »

Parental Rights, Reproductive Rights, and Youth’s Sexuality in Alberta, Then and Now

By Karissa Patton, MA Student, University of Lethbridge The struggle for reproductive rights and justice are often associated with women’s activisms of the past, specifically the activism of the late 1960s, the 1970s, and the 1980s, leading to the 1988 Supreme Court decision that fully decriminalized abortion in Canada.[1] Authors such as Catherine Redfern and Kristine Aune have highlighted a… Read more »

Abortion: The Unfinished Revolution comes to PEI because of unsafe abortion practices

Colleen MacQuarrie, Associate Professor and Chair Psychology Department, UPEI A surgical abortion is a simple 10-minute procedure that once was available to women on Prince Edward Island. In 1986, a strong anti-choice lobbying group shut down this service and for the past 28 years their actions have continued to deny women access to this health service in PEI.[1]  Instead, most… Read more »

November 8, 1994

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Jessica Shaw, PhD candidate, University of Calgary Abortion evokes strong political and emotional reactions, and tends to be framed around arguments of morality and legality. However, women have had and will continue to have abortions regardless of their morality, regardless of their legality, regardless of what the foetus may or may not be, and regardless of whether they are offered… Read more »

Scientific Reasoning in the Canadian Anti-Abortion Movement

Katrina Ackerman, PhD Candidate, University of Waterloo Recent media coverage of an Alberta doctor’s refusal to prescribe birth control to walk-in clinic patients indicates the medical profession’s ongoing struggle to balance personal morality and professional ethics. Whether a doctor should be able to deny birth control prescriptions or abortion referrals based on moral or religious grounds is a murky issue… Read more »