Category Archives: Series

Where Have All the Books Gone? Research and Writing During the Pandemic

This is the third post in the Pandemic Methodologies series. See the introductory post for more information. by Erin Spinney Books are a part of my life.  When I moved across the country, and then across the country again and again, the books were what got stuffed inside the trunk of the car and filled up the suitcases; while clothing, dishes,… Read more »

E.P. Thompson’s The Making of the English Working Class, Industrial Capitalism, and the Climate Emergency

This is the eleventh post in the series Historians Confront the Climate Emergency, hosted by ActiveHistory.ca, NiCHE (Network in Canadian History & Environment), Historical Climatology, and Climate History Network. By Jim Clifford “If you are a historian, your work is about global warming.” Dagomar Degroot. A few weeks ago Dagomar Degroot provided an overview of the excellent work done by historians of science,… Read more »

Reflections on Disability and (Dis)Rupture in Pandemic Learning

This is the second post in the Pandemic Methodologies series. See the introductory post for more information. By Hannah S. Facknitz and Danielle E. Lorenz In June, as part of the Pandemic Methodologies Twitter Conference, we wrote about our precarity as disabled graduate students (especially as educators) in Canada during the COVID-19 Pandemic. We wanted to talk about how the… Read more »

After the Conference: The Pandemic Labour of Graduate Student and Early Career Scholars

by Erin Gallagher-Cohoon and Letitia Johnson  In April 2021, Erin started to write a piece she would later call “Pandemic Methodologies.” Without much of a plan, she only knew that she wanted to figure out how to verbalize what it felt like to be doing historical research during the COVID-19 pandemic. It was deeply personal, born out of little and… Read more »

A Precautionary History?

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This is the tenth post in the series Historians Confront the Climate Emergency, hosted by ActiveHistory.ca, NiCHE (Network in Canadian History & Environment), Historical Climatology, and Climate History Network. By Thomas Wien The next Ice Age is behind schedule. Now for the bad news: the infernal and, for many in the northern hemisphere, eye-opening summer of 2021 has shown that global warming’s effects… Read more »

2021 Bike. Race. America.

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By Jeffers Lennox This is the sixth in a series, “History En Vélo,” about cycling and thinking historically, shared with NiCHE. We do it every year, if we can. It’s only an 80 minute train ride on the Metro North from New Haven to Harlem, and Father’s Day seems like a perfect excuse to explore the city and spend the afternoon watching… Read more »

Teaching the Climate Emergency in World History

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This is the ninth post in the series Historians Confront the Climate Emergency, hosted by ActiveHistory.ca, NiCHE (Network in Canadian History & Environment), Historical Climatology, and Climate History Network. By Philip Gooding I recently taught a remote, intensive Summer course entitled ‘Themes in World History’ at McGill University. This course was aimed mostly at second- and third- year undergraduate students. I chose as… Read more »

Climate Resilience, Past and Present: Rural Communities and Food Systems

This is the eighth post in the series Historians Confront the Climate Emergency, hosted by ActiveHistory.ca, NiCHE (Network in Canadian History & Environment), Historical Climatology, and Climate History Network. By Emma Moesswilde This summer, the raspberry crop at Daisy Chain Farm was much smaller than usual. The variable winter weather meant that abnormal freeze-thaw cycles caused the raspberry canes to lose their resistance… Read more »

Indexed Shifting: Past and Present from the Bike Saddle

By Steven Schwinghamer This is the fifth in a series, “History En Vêlo,” about cycling and thinking historically, shared with NiCHE. Biking happens at the right combination of speed, effort, and scope for me to do some interesting thinking about places. Being raised in a Canadian historiographical canon, I suppose it’s a cousin to Harold Innis’ “dirt research,” although as Josh Howe… Read more »

Climate at the Speed of Weather

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This is the seventh post in the series, “Historians Confront the Climate Emergency,” hosted by ActiveHistory.ca, NiCHE (Network in Canadian History & Environment), Historical Climatology and Climate History Network. By Alan MacEachern They say that climate is what you expect but weather is what you get. Or they used to say that. Now, the climate seems to be changing as quickly and unexpectedly as weather…. Read more »