New paper – Victory in the Kitchen: Food Control in the Lakehead during the Great War by Beverly Soloway

November 18, 2014

ActiveHistory.ca  is featuring the following paper as part of  “Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca”, a multi-year series of regular posts about the history and centennial of the First World War.  It was first published by Papers & Records, Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society, 2014.  By Beverly Soloway In the summer of 1914, the […]

Read the full article →

‘It’s history, like it or not’: the Significance of Sudbury’s Superstack

November 17, 2014

By: Mike Commito and Kaleigh Bradley Standing at a height of 1,250 feet, the Sudbury Superstack is the second tallest chimney in the world and runner-up to the CN Tower for the tallest structure in Canada. Until 1987, Sudbury Ontario had the dubious honour of having the world’s tallest smokestack. Today, the Stack is seen […]

Read the full article →

Ignorance of History as a Site of Memory

November 13, 2014

By Raphaël Gani The discourse about Canadians ignoring their collective past, or not knowing their national history, is neither new (Osborne, 2003) nor limited to Canada (Wineburg, 2001). Such a view tends to be legitimized according to surveys in which people fail to identify famous events and politicians. This failure is also linked with angst […]

Read the full article →

Jean Baptiste Assiginack: The Starling aka Blackbird

November 12, 2014

By Alan Corbiere This post marks the third in a series of essays – posted the second Wednesday of each month – by Alan Corbiere focusing on Anishinaabeg participation in the War of 1812.  On the morning of October 5, 1861, 96 year old Odaawaa Chief Jean Baptiste Assiginack of the Biipiigwenh (Sparrowhawk) clan rose […]

Read the full article →

1864 vs. 1914: A Commemorative Showdown

November 11, 2014

ActiveHistory.ca is featuring this post as part of  “Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca”, a multi-year series of regular posts about the history and centennial of the First World War.  By Sarah Glassford As I sat by the window of a popular coffee shop in downtown Charlottetown on a warm afternoon in […]

Read the full article →

Podcast – Robert Rutherdale on the Local Responses of WWI

November 10, 2014

  ActiveHistory.ca is featuring this podcast as part of  “Canada’s First World War: A Centennial Series on ActiveHistory.ca”, a multi-year series of regular posts about the history and centennial of the First World War.  ActiveHistory.ca is happy to feature the inaugural talk of the Fall 2014 History Matters lecture series: historian Robert Rutherdale’s “Hometown Horizons: […]

Read the full article →

Podcast – Canadian Historians and the Media

November 7, 2014

Podcast: Play in new window | Download On Wednesday May 28, 2014 as part of the Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting, Activehistory.ca sponsored a roundtable discussion on the presence of Canadian historians in the media. The session was chaired by Ian Milligan of the University of Waterloo and featured Ian Mosby (McMaster University), Maureen Lux […]

Read the full article →

Why I’ll wait to visit the Canadian Museum of Human Rights

November 6, 2014

By B. Trofanenko On September 20, 2014, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) opened its doors to the world. Considering the CMHR a “great national project,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper remarked how the museum will stand for “freedom, democracy, human rights, and the rule of law” and as a “monument to Canada’s embrace of […]

Read the full article →

History Slam Episode Fifty-Five: Celebrating Canada Part 2

November 5, 2014

Podcast: Play in new window | Download By Sean Graham Last Wednesday we posted the first part of our first ever two part episode in which I talked with Matthew Hayday, Marc-André Gagnon, and Robert Talbot about the Celebrating Canada workshop. Then on Friday we posted a recording of the roundtable discussion that kicked off […]

Read the full article →

A Historian on Catalan Independence

November 4, 2014

By Aitana Guia On November 9, 2014, hundreds of thousands of Catalans, perhaps millions, will print their own unofficial ballots and head to improvised polling stations to cast a vote for independence that nobody else but them will consider valid. Most Catalans opposed to independence will stay at home and lament growing political polarization. The […]

Read the full article →